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By Jeff Pardo

What is the highest altitude to which a non-rocket powered aircraft could ascend?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Officially, FAR stands for...  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Where will you hear the call signs 'Cactus', 'Tsunami', or 'Cowboy' on ATC frequencies?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Who and what are the Quiet Birdmen?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

What was the first aircraft able to break the sound barrier while in level flight?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Two pairs of aircraft are in formation flight. One pair is 10,000 feet, and the other pair is quite a bit higher; at one million feet. (In other words, outside the earth's atmosphere about 190 miles up, in orbit.) In each case, one aircraft is in front of the other. If the second aircraft in each formation wants to overtake the first, what must it do, in each case?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Most of us know what to expect if we were intercepted during the daytime, but what would you see at night?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

One of the first passenger jets to enter commercial service was the venerable Boeing 707. What did test pilot Tex Johnston do with a Boeing 707 prototype in front of about 200,000 people, at Seattle's annual Seafair festival in 1955?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

If you want a special N number for your airplane, (even if you don't own one yet or have not finished building it), how do you go about getting one?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

America's highest scoring ace during World War II was Richard Bong. Flying the P-38 Lightning in the Pacific, Major Richard Bong was credited with 40 kills...  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

The world's first airliner was...  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Under what circumstances could a glider actually glide to the visual horizon, without the benefit of a tailwind?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Night, as defined in CFR14, FAR Part 1, is the time between the end of evening civil twilight and morning civil twilight, as published in the American Air Almanac, converted to local time. But what exactly IS the meaning of twilight?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

What is a MOCA, and what is it for?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Is there a reason why you should ever shut off your aircraft's DME if you're not using it?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Your throttle linkage just broke. You're stuck in climb (or cruise) power. What are your options?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

At major airports, you will often see varied types of approach lights. Most burn steadily, some flash...  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: When a controller asks you to 'maintain runway heading', what does he REALLY mean?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Subject: Methuselah's Wings - Who is the world's oldest pilot?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Here's one that's worth a few shekels...  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Subject: Is the earth REALLY flat? Just a little bit?

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By Jeff Pardo

Our sixth installment of aviation trivia guaranteed to strain your brain power.

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By Jeff Pardo

Aviation trivia from prohibited airspace to the lightest metal...

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By Jeff Pardo

Airline pilots must retire at age 60. What is the mandatory retirement age that generally applies to air traffic controllers?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

You’re in a descent, passing through 1000 feet, and approaching your destination airport in southern Arizona, at night. You happen to notice an aircraft at a lower altitude, also near the airport, but it has no lights on. Is it possible that this aircraft is operating legally?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

The FAA rules require that we fly with current charts.  Most of us have probably noticed that, overall, although the FAA's National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) updates terminal area charts and sectional charts every six months, sectionals don’t really change all that much from one edition to the next, six months later. It seems as though they’re issued every six months whether or not there have been any changes. Is this wasteful, or are there really always enough changes to justify it? Approximately how many changes are there in the average sectional and Terminal Area Chart, from one to the next?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Which of the following have not, at least once, been flown through by an airplane?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Aside from ultralights or any “sport class” aircraft, under what circumstances is it possible for a pilot without a medical to legally fly as PIC in a regular powered fixed-wing aircraft?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Accidents involving degraded performance due to density altitude continue to plague pilots. The precise effects of temperature upon pressure altitude and related corrections are applied by all pilots, but the one additional ingredient in the mix that affects density altitude, namely humidity, is largely ignored.  What are the approximate respective altitude corrections, in feet, for humid air at 100% relative humidity when the air temperature is 50 °F, 70 °F, 90 °F, and 100 °F ?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

1) Airplane propellers generate most of the noise that is the source of complaints (at least those against piston and turboprop airplanes). The noise becomes much worse as propellers reach transonic speeds. If airplane wings can spoof critical Mach numbers by means of their sweep-back, why aren't the propellers on small airplanes also swept back?

2) Based upon the FAA's own data, which do you suppose have been the hardest FAA written tests? Aircraft Dispatcher, Ground Instructor, ATP Helicopter, Flight Instructor Gyroplane, Inspection Authorization.

3) Wherever the President visits, a large chunk of instant Special Use Airspace follows. In this case, 'large' means a cylinder with a radius of up to thirty miles (although at Camp David, it is 'only' 10), and going up to 17,999 feet MSL. What, if any, is the protective airspace around the Vice President?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

1) How long have directions been expressed in degrees clockwise from North?
2) How fast would you need to go in order for at least part of your Skyhawk to exceed Mach One?
3) When may a pilot descend below the glide slope on a visual (or even an instrument approach) and land on the displaced threshold?  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

The first person to propose the use of wind tunnels to gather aerodynamic data was:
A)        Wilbur Wright in 1901
B)        Francis H. Wenham, in 1871
C)        Edme Mariotte in 1673
D)        Leonardo daVinci, ca. 1490

  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

The first person to propose the use of wind tunnels to gather aerodynamic data was:
A) Wilbur Wright in 1901
B) Francis H. Wenham, in 1871
C) Edme Mariotte in 1673
D) Leonardo daVinci, ca. 1490

  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: True or False: Airline pilots may not pilot an airliner in the United States once they have passed their sixtieth birthday.  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: The highest mountain peak on Earth, in reality, is:
A) Mauna Kea
B) Mount Chimborazo
C) Mount Everest
D) Mount McKinley
  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: The advantage of a high aspect ratio wing was first recognized in:
A) 1804
B) 1866
C) 1903
D) 1918
  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: America’s first swept-wing fighter was
A) J.W. Dunne’s D.5 tailless swept wing biplane
B) the Curtis-Wright XP-55 Ascender
C) an Allied version of the Messerschmitt P.1101
D) the North American F-86 Sabre

  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Special crew qualifications were required to land using a rather infamous approach to the southeast into Hong Kong because of terrain and other problems. Because a straight-in approach towards this particular runway was not possible, an approach was made with which system?

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By Jeff Pardo

The first case of unlawful interference with a civil airliner occurred where?
A) United States
B) Canada
C) Peru
D) China

  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: The world's first fixed location devoted to the landing and departure of flying machines that was referred to in the way we most often do now, that is by the term 'airport' was:
A) Wings Field, PA
B) College Park Airport, MD
C) Bader Field, Atlantic City, NJ
D) Hammonton Municipal, NY
E) Wright-Patterson AFB  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: True or false: The viscosity (or 'stickiness') of a gas actually increases with increasing temperature (unlike a liquid). So even though it becomes less dense when warmed, and its molecules move further apart and more quickly, a gas becomes, in a way, thicker at the same time that it gets thinner.  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

If it is not possible to get a departure clearance from ATC, and you absolutely must take off from an uncontrolled airport in IMC, what’s the best and safest way for you to depart?
A) Maintain at least a 500 foot per minute climb
B) Climb straight ahead and do not make any turn until in VMC conditions
C) Fly the approach in reverse
D) Don’t; walk!

  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

You are flying a Normal Category aircraft. During cruise, ATC informs you that moderate turbulence is to be expected in about 10 miles on your route of flight. You quickly try to remember what the maneuvering speed (Va) is for your aircraft, is but to no avail. On the placard in front of you, though, is written the stall speed, which is 50 knots. Which number would be closest to Va for your aircraft?
A) 75
B) 88
C) 100
D) 125

  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

True or false: A departing airliner may stir the fog near an RVR sensor.

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By Jeff Pardo

Question: Who was the first person to build a rubber band powered airplane, and what was so special about it?
A) John Stringfellow, 1868
B) Alphonse Pénaud, 1871
C) Alexander Mozhaiski, 1884
D) Samuel Pierpont Langley, 1891

  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

Question: You've seen the Trivia question about the first words spoken by mankind on another heavenly body, but what were (so far at least) the last words?
A) 'Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle is lifting off.'
B) 'Roger, go at throttle up.'
C) 'Okay, now let's get off. Forget the camera.'
D) 'Let's get this mutha outta here.'
  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

True or false: NASA and the USAF designed tailless aircraft. In such aircraft, would it be correct to say that as far as the turn coordinator is concerned, there would be minimal ball movement during all phases of flight?

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By Jeff Pardo

True or false: It has been calculated that to carry regularly the weight of just one small sachet of sugar on a Boeing 747 would increase fuel consumption by one gallon per year.

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By Jeff Pardo

Question: The year of the first documented sustained flight of a heavier-than-air powered flying machine was:
A) 1874
B) 1884
C) 1896
D) 1901
E) 1903
  Continue»

By Jeff Pardo

True or False: America actually had a designated airplane the sole function of which was to be shot at. Oh, and it wasn’t a drone; it was manned, with a live (and possibly not always quite enthusiastically willing) pilot.

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